Abigail Cahill

October 3rd, 2019

Chenuil, A., Cahill, A. E., Délémontey, N., Du Salliant du Luc, E., & Fanton, H. (2019). Problems and Questions Posed by Cryptic Species. A Framework to Guide Future Studies. In M. d. S. J. Casetta E., Vecchi D. (Ed.), From Assessing to Conserving Biodiversity. History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences (Vol. 24, pp. 77-106). Cham.: Springer.

Abstract: Species are the currency of biology and important units of biodiversity, thus errors in species delimitations potentially have important consequences. During the last decades, owing to the use of genetic markers, many nominal species appeared to consist of several reproductively isolated entities called cryptic species (hereafter CS). In this chapter we explain why CS are important for practical reasons related to community and ecosystem monitoring, and for biological knowledge, particularly for understanding ecological and evolutionary processes. To find solutions to practical problems and to correct biological errors, a thorough analysis of the distinct types of CS reported in the literature is necessary and some general rules have to be identified. Here we explain how to identify CS, and we propose a rational and practical classification of CS (and putative CS), based on the crossing of distinct levels of genetic isolation with distinct levels of morphological differentiation. We also explain how to identify likely explanations for a given CS (either inherent to taxonomic processes or related to taxon biology, ecology and geography) and how to build a comprehensive database aimed at answering these practical and theoretical questions. Our pilot review of the literature in marine animals established that half of the reported cases are not CS sensu stricto (i.e. where morphology cannot distinguish the entities) and just need taxonomic revision. It also revealed significant associations between CS features, such as a higher proportion of diagnostic morphological differences in sympatric than in allopatric CS and more frequent ecological differentiation between sympatric than allopatric CS, both observations supporting the competitive exclusion theory, thus suggesting that ignoring CS causes not only species diversity but also functional diversity underestimation.

Helena Mesa

October 3rd, 2019

Mesa, H. (2018). Invitation. Valparaiso Poetry Review, XIX(2).

Meghan Farley Webb

October 3rd, 2019

Martinez, B., Cardona, S., Rodas, P., Lubina, M., Gonzalez, A., Farley Webb, M., . . . Rohloff, P. (2018). Developmental outcomes of an individualised complementary feeding intervention for stunted children: a substudy from a larger randomised controlled trial in Guatemala. BMJ Paediatrics Open, 2(1), e000314.

Abstract: Stunting is a common cause of early child developmental delay; Guatemala has the fourth highest rate of stunting globally. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of an intensive community health worker-led complementary feeding intervention on early child development in Guatemala. We hypothesised that the intervention would improve child development over usual care.

Matthew Schoene

October 3rd, 2019

Kołczyńska, M., & Schoene, M. (2018). Survey Data Harmonization and the Quality of Data Documentation in Cross‐national Surveys. In T. P. Johnson, B.-E. Pennell, I. A. L. Stoop, & B. Dorer (Eds.), Advances in Comparative Survey Methods: Multinational, Multiregional, and Multicultural Contexts (pp. 963-984). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Abstract: This chapter focuses on research within the Harmonization Project and develops a schema for evaluating survey quality as reflected in the general documentation of a given survey. This schema takes into account stages of survey design and implementation crucial for yielding high quality data, which a given survey’s documentation should report on. The chapter discusses whether the descriptive documentation that accompanies each data file provides information about the completion of the stages the schema identifies. It utilizes the variables to analyze differences among surveys with regard to their quality as reflected in the documentation. The chapter discusses how documentation can be improved and shows how researchers can best make use of it. It focuses on five stages of the survey process that investigators should have information on to decide whether given cross‐national surveys meet their research needs. These are sampling, response rate, questionnaire translation, pretesting, and fieldwork control.

Mick McRivette

September 6th, 2019

Wu, C., Zuza, A. V., Zhou, Z. G., Yin, A., McRivette, M. W., Chen, X. H., et al. (2019). Mesozoic-Cenozoic evolution of the Eastern Kunlun Range, central Tibet, and implications for basin evolution during the Indo-Asian collision. Lithosphere, 11(4), 524-550.

Abstract: The present-day Tibetan plateau, which is the largest highland on Earth, formed primarily due to the India-Asia collision since 50-60 Ma. The development of the plateau has been associated with the Cenozoic development of two large intra-plateau sedimentary basins in north-central Tibet: the Qaidam and Hoh Xil basins to the north and south of the Eastern Kunlun Range, respectively. We conducted an integrated study of these two basins and the Eastern Kunlun Range that separates them to understand the timing and mechanisms of their development in order to decipher the growth and uplift history of the plateau. Crustal shortening in the Fenghuoshan-Nangqian and Qilian Shan-Nan Shan thrust belts initiated no later than the early Eocene, which formed the northern and southern boundaries of the combined Hoh Xil and Qaidam basins in central Tibet. The distinct two-stage development of the Hoh Xil basin suggests emergence of a topographic barrier between the Hoh Xil basin in the south and Qaidam basin in the north in the early Neogene, which is supported by the existing and new apatite fission-track data from the Eastern Kunlun Range that suggest rapid cooling after ca. 20 Ma. Previous and newly collected geochronological, petrological, and thermochronological data are best interpreted in the context of the Paleogene Paleo-Qaidam hypothesis, which requires Hoh Xil and Qaidam basins to have been parts of a single integrated basin during the early stage of the Cenozoic Tibetan plateau development.

Abigail Cahill

August 22nd, 2019

El Ayari, T., Trigui El Menif, N., Hamer, B., Cahill, A. E., & Bierne, N. (2019). The hidden side of a major marine biogeographic boundary: a wide mosaic hybrid zone at the Atlantic–Mediterranean divide reveals the complex interaction between natural and genetic barriers in mussels. Heredity, 122, 770-784.

Abstract: The Almeria–Oran Front (AOF) is a recognised hotspot of genetic differentiation in the sea, with genetic discontinuities reported in more than 50 species. The AOF is a barrier to dispersal and an ecological boundary; both can determine the position of these genetic breaks. However, the maintenance of genetic differentiation is likely reinforced by genetic barriers. A general drawback of previous studies is an insufficient density of sampling sites at the transition zone, with a conspicuous lack of samples from the southern coastline. We analysed the fine-scale genetic structure in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis using a few ancestry-informative loci previously identified from genome scans. We discovered a 600-km-wide mosaic hybrid zone eastward of the AOF along the Algerian coasts. This mosaic zone provides a new twist to our understanding of the Atlantic–Mediterranean transition because it demonstrates that the two lineages can live in sympatry with ample opportunities to interbreed in a large area, but they hardly do so. This implies that some form of reproductive isolation must exist to maintain the two genetic backgrounds locally cohesive. The mosaic zone ends with an abrupt genetic shift at a barrier to dispersal in the Gulf of Bejaia, Eastern Algeria. Simulations of endogenous or exogenous selection in models that account for the geography and hydrodynamic features of the region support the hypothesis that sister hybrid zones could have been differentially trapped at two alternative barriers to dispersal and/or environmental boundaries, at Almeria in the north and Bejaia in the south. A preponderantly unidirectional north–south gene flow next to the AOF can also maintain a patch of intrinsically maintained genetic background in the south and the mosaic structure, even in the absence of local adaptation. Our results concur with the coupling hypothesis that suggests that natural barriers can explain the position of genetic breaks, while their maintenance depends on genetic barriers.

Vicki Baker

August 22nd, 2019

Lunsford, L., Baker, V., & Pifer, M. (2018). Faculty mentoring faculty: career stages, relationship quality, and job satisfaction. International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, 7(2), 139-154.

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to understand faculty mentoring experiences across career stages and the influence of mentoring relationship quality on job satisfaction. The study participants were faculty members from a consortium of liberal arts colleges in the USA. The theoretical lens draws from scholarship on career stages, developmental networks, and working alliances.  The analysis is based on a subset of 415 faculty member responses about mentoring from a larger data set on faculty development. The online survey was conducted in Spring 2014. Frequencies, χ2, regression equations, and confirmatory factor analysis were computed using R statistical software. Over half the faculty members were both mentors and protégés; although, a sizable minority of faculty members did not engage in mentoring. Early-career faculty members were significantly more likely to have a mentor than were mid- or late-career faculty members. For both mentors and protégés, the higher they rated the quality of the mentoring relationship, the more job satisfaction they reported; this finding was greatest for mid-career (associate rank) faculty members. Participants reported significantly higher relationship quality with their mentors than with their protégés.

Helena Mesa

August 9th, 2019

Mesa, H. (2018). “609 Delicias, Vibora, La Habana, Cuba”, and: “Prayer for the Exhumation”, and: “Restoration”. Prairie Schooner, 92(2), 119-123.

Ashley Miller

August 9th, 2019

Miller, A. (2018). Christina Rossetti’s Radical Objectivity. Victorian Literature and Culture, 46(1), 143-156.

Michael Dixon

August 9th, 2019

Dixon, M. (2018). “The More Things Change the More They Stay the Same“. GoggleWorks 12th Annual Juried Exhibition, May 4-31, 2018.

Mark Bollman

August 9th, 2019

Bollman, M. (2018). Mathematics of Keno and Lotteries. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group.

Nicolle Zellner

August 8th, 2019

Zellner, N. (2018). Video Killed the Writing Assignment. Journal of Astronomy & Earth Sciences Education (JAESE), 5(2), 137-150.

Abstract: An introductory Astronomy survey course is often taken to satisfy a college graduation requirement for non-science majors at colleges around the United States. In this course, material that can be broadly categorized into topics related to “the sky”, “the Solar System”, “the Galaxy”, and “cosmology” is discussed. Even with the wide variety of topics in these categories, though, students may not be 100% interested in the course content, and it is almost certain that a specific topic about which a student wishes to learn is not covered. To at least partly address these issues, to appeal to all of the students in this class, and to allow students to explore topics of their choice, a video project has been assigned to students at Albion College as a class activity. In this assignment, students are asked to create a video of a famous (or not) astronomer, astronomical object or discovery, or telescope observatory to present to the class. Students work in pairs to create a video that is original and imaginative and includes accurate scientific content. For this project, then, students use a familiar technology and exercise their creativity while learning a little (or a lot of) science along the way. Herein data on types and topics of videos, examples of videos, assignment requirements and grading rubrics, lessons learned, and student comments will be discussed and shared.

Mareike Wieth, Andrea Francis, Drew Christopher

August 1st, 2019

Wieth, M. B., Francis, A. P., & Christopher, A. N. (2019). Use of a Creative Problem Solving (CPS) Approach in a Senior Thesis Course to Advance Undergraduate Publications. Frontiers in Psychology, 10.

Abstract: We outline a creativity-based course model for supervising and promoting undergraduate research at a small liberal arts college of about 1,600 undergraduate students, with no graduate offerings. This approach could easily be modified and implemented at weekly brownbag or joint laboratory meetings at similar and larger types of schools. At our institution this course is required of all psychology research thesis students (on average 8 per year) and requires the cooperation of the students, their thesis supervisors, and the course instructor. In part because of this course, during the past 20 years, our department faculty have published a total of 47 publications with undergraduates in peer-reviewed outlets such as Personality and Individual Differences, Psychology of Music, Psychology of Women Quarterly, and Sex Roles. Importantly, according to PsycINFO, these undergraduate-generated publications have garnered more than 500 citations, attesting to the impact that undergraduate research can have on the larger field in terms of knowledge generation. In addition to impactful peer-reviewed publications, our undergraduate students have presented 163 posters at national conferences such as the Association for Psychological Science, Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Society for Neuroscience, and Psychonomic Society. Below we outline how our senior thesis course stimulates the creative dissemination of knowledge that is required during the publication process.

Abigail Cahill

July 16th, 2019

De Jode, A., David, R., Haguenauer, A., Cahill, A. E., Erga, Z., Guillemain, D., . . . Chenuil, A. (2019). From seascape ecology to population genomics and back. Spatial and ecological differentiation among cryptic species of the red algae Lithophyllum stictiforme/L. cabiochiae, main bioconstructors of coralligenous habitats. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 137, 104-113.

Abstract: Ecosystem engineering species alter the physical structure of their environment and can create or modify habitats, having a massive impact on local biodiversity. Coralligenous reefs are highly diverse habitats endemic to the Mediterranean Sea built by calcareous benthic organisms among which Crustose Coralline Algae are the main engineering species. We analyzed the diversity of Lithophyllum stictiforme or L. cabiochiae in coralligenous habitats combining a multiple barcode and a population genomics approach with seascape features. Population genomics allowed disentangling pure spatial effects from environmental effects. We found that these taxa form a complex of eight highly divergent cryptic species that are easily identifiable using classic barcode markers (psbA, LSU, COI). Three factors have a significant effect on the relative abundances of these cryptic species: the location along the French Mediterranean coast, depth and Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR). The analysis of around 5000 SNPs for the most abundant species revealed genetic differentiation among localities in the Bay of Marseille but no differentiation between depths within locality. Thus, the effect of depth and PAR on cryptic species communities is not a consequence of restricted connectivity but rather due to differential settlement or survival among cryptic species. This differential is more likely driven by irradiance levels rather than by pressure or temperature. Both the genetic and species diversity patterns are congruent with the main patterns of currents in the Bay. Ecological differentiation among these engineering cryptic species, sensitive to ocean warming and acidification, could have important consequences on the diversity and structure of the coralligenous communities.

Carrie Booth Walling

July 16th, 2019

Walling, C. B. (2018). Syria and the responsibility to prosecute: norm promotion in the UN Security Council. In K. Mills & M. Labonte (Eds.), Accessing and Implementing Human Rights and Justice (pp. 39-64). New York: Routledge.

Vicki Baker

July 15th, 2019

Baker, V. L., Lunsford, L. G., & Pifer, M. J. (2019). Patching Up the “Leaking Leadership Pipeline”: Fostering Mid-career Faculty Succession Management. Research in Higher Education, 60, 823-843.

Abstract: The research presented here contributes to research and practice focused on faculty leadership development by examining the leadership pipeline for mid-career faculty in a consortium of 13 liberal arts colleges. Research findings revealed that mid-career faculty members are in the leadership pipeline, with the department chair position serving as an entry point. However, leadership aspirations beyond the department chair position decline serving as a source of the leaking leadership pipeline. Differences were found by gender. Further, issues of lack of preparation for current and future leadership roles was connected to few mid-career faculty members aspiring to executive leadership positions. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

 

Buket Aydas

July 15th, 2019

Bahado-Singh, R. O., Sonek, J., McKenna, D., Cool, D., Aydas, B., Turkoglu, O., . . . Yilmaz, A. (2019). Artificial intelligence and amniotic fluid multiomics: prediction of perinatal outcome in asymptomatic women with short cervix. Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, 54(1), 110-118.

Objective: To evaluate the application of artificial intelligence (AI), i.e. deep learning and other machine-learning techniques, to amniotic fluid (AF) metabolomics and proteomics, alone and in combination with sonographic, clinical and demographic factors, in the prediction of perinatal outcome in asymptomatic pregnant women with short cervical length (CL).

Matthew Schoene

July 15th, 2019

Schoene, M. (2018). Protest Wave or Protest Spike? Contention: The Multidisciplinary Journal of Social Protest, 6(2), 19-43.

Abstract: Recent scholarly attention has designated European protest activity from 2011 to 2013 a “protest wave,” a term with specific sociological meaning. While many European countries indeed experienced a period of unrest, I argue that for protest activity to be considered a wave, the protest in question must be significantly higher than normative levels of participation. To this end, I conceptualize national protest culture as an explanatory factor for recent protest activity. Using the European Social Survey, a series of multilevel mixed effects regression models for 22 countries demonstrates that the most powerful predictor of protest in 2012 is the protest rate for each country in 2008. I therefore question this period’s designation as a protest wave and instead choose to refer to it as a set of discrete protest spikes.

Sheila Lyons-Sobaski

July 15th, 2019

Crang, R. F. E., Lyons-Sobaski, S. A., & Wise, R. R. (2018). Plant anatomy: a concept-based approach to the structure of seed plants. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

 

Nels Christensen

July 15th, 2019

Christensen, N. (2018). Experimenting with “Circles”. In M. C. Long & S. R. Meehan (Eds.), Approaches to Teaching the Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson (pp. 93-97). New York: The Modern Language Association of America.

 

Vicki Baker

July 15th, 2019

Baker, V. L., Lunsford, L. G., Neisler, G., Pifer, M. J., & Terosky, A. L. (Eds.). (2018). Success After Tenure: Supporting Mid-Career Faculty. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

Abstract: This book brings together leading practitioners and scholars engaged in professional development programming for and research on mid-career faculty members. The chapters focus on key areas of career development and advancement that can enhance both individual growth and institutional change to better support mid-career faculties. (Publisher’s Description)

Drew Christopher

July 8th, 2019

Gurung, R. A. R., Richmond, A., Drouin, M., Landrum, R. E., & Christopher, A. N. (2019). The past, present, and future of scholarship of teaching and learning in psychology. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology, 5(2), 97-120.

Abstract: We report data from a national survey of faculty (N = 482) that examined scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) research across 7 dimensions of productivity, comparing current perceptions of SoTL with those of a previous study published 10 years ago, and differences across disciplines, institutions, and gender. Psychology faculty had more positive perceptions of SoTL in general than nonpsychology faculty and perceived more departmental support for SoTL work than they did in the past. Psychology faculty, relative to nonpsychology faculty, also believed that their departmental colleagues were more supportive of SoTL efforts and that their departments supported such work. However, we found that perceptions varied across institutions, with faculty at baccalaureate institutions having more positive perceptions of SoTL than faculty at community colleges and doctoral granting institutions. Although there were similarities in SoTL support across years and faculty type, there was a positive trend in perceptions of support over time. We found only 1 significant gender difference: Men reported higher engagement with SoTL than women. Overall, we conclude that SoTL is evolving into an accepted form of scholarship; however, this form of scholarship may currently be more accepted and valued in psychology than in other disciplines.

Holly Sheets

July 8th, 2019

Deming, D., Louie, D., & Sheets, H. (2019). How to Characterize the Atmosphere of a Transiting Exoplanet. Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 131(995), 013001.

Abstract: This tutorial is an introduction to techniques used to characterize the atmospheres of transiting exoplanets. We intend it to be a useful guide for the undergraduate, graduate student, or postdoctoral scholar who wants to begin research in this field, but who has no prior experience with transiting exoplanets. We begin with a discussion of the properties of exoplanetary systems that allow us to measure exoplanetary spectra, and the principles that underlie transit techniques. Subsequently, we discuss the most favorable wavelengths for observing, and explain the specific techniques of secondary eclipses and eclipse mapping, phase curves, transit spectroscopy, and convolution with spectral templates. Our discussion includes factors that affect the data acquisition, and also a separate discussion of how the results are interpreted. Other important topics that we cover include statistical methods to characterize atmospheres such as stacking, and the effects of stellar activity. We conclude by projecting the future utility of large-aperture observatories such as the James Webb Space Telescope and the forthcoming generation of extremely large ground-based telescopes.

Abigail Cahill

July 8th, 2019

David, R., Uyarra, M., Carvalho, S., Anlauf, H., Borja, A., Cahill, A., . . . Chenuil, A. (2019). Lessons from photo analyses of Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures as tools to detect (bio-)geographical, spatial, and environmental effects. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 141, 420-429.

Abstract: We investigated the validity of Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) as monitoring tools for hard bottoms across a wide geographic and environmental range. We deployed 36 ARMS in the northeast Atlantic, northwest Mediterranean, Adriatic and Red Sea at 7–17 m depth. After 12–16 months, community composition was inferred from photographs, in six plate-faces for each ARMS. Overall, we found a highly significant effect of sea region, site (within seas), and plate-face on community composition. Plate-faces thus represent distinct micro-habitats and provide pseudo-replicates, increasing statistical power. Within each sea region taken individually, there was also a highly significant effect of site and plate-face. Because strong effects were obtained despite the fusion of taxonomic categories at high taxonomic ranks (to ensure comparability among biogeographic provinces), ARMS photo-analysis appears a promising monitoring tool for each sea region. We recommend keeping three ARMS per site and analyzing more numerous sites within a sea region to investigate environmental effects.

Jeffrey Cox

July 8th, 2019

Cox, J. G. (2019). Verbal Quantifiers and Communicating Painkiller Side Effect Risk. Health Communication.

Abstract: The two studies reported here explore the use of verbal quantifiers (e.g., “common”) as an alternative to the numerical presentation of risk information about prescription drugs. Guided by work on adverb-adjective pairs (Study 1) and research on fuzzy trace theory (Study 2), predictions are made about participants’ risk perceptions after reading verbal presentations of a medication’s side effects. Participants report their perceptions about the drug’s side effects’ occurrence among users. In Study 1, pairs of adverbs and adjectives (e.g., “very rare”) are used in contrast to adjectives alone to convey numerical risk information. In Study 2, severity and more general risk perception measures are added to better understand bottom-down schema processing. Findings show that individuals vastly overestimate the likelihood of side effects occurring, compared with the European Union’s CIOMS III recommendations (e.g., “rare” side effects affect .01-.1% of users), and demonstrate support for the differences between gist and verbatim processing of risk information.

Nancy Demerdash

July 3rd, 2019

Demerdash, N. (2019). Constructing Dignity: Primitivist Discourses and the Spatial Economies of Development in Postcolonial Tunisia. In K. Kılınç & M. Gharipour (Eds.), Social Housing in the Middle East: Architecture, Urban Development, and Transnational Modernity (pp. 117-141). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

 

Scott Melzer

July 3rd, 2019

Melzer, S. (2019). Fighting the Left and Leading the Right: NRA Politics and Power through the 2016 Elections. In J. Carlson, K. A. Goss, & H. Shapira (Eds.), Gun Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Politics, Policy, and Practice. New York: Routledge.

 

Dan Skean

July 3rd, 2019

Michelangeli, F. A., Goldenberg, R., Almeda, F., Judd, W. S., Becquer, E. R., Ocampo, G., Ionta,G.M., Skean, J.D., Majure, L.C., Penneys, D. S. (2019). Nomenclatural novelties in Miconia (Melastomataceae: Miconieae). Brittonia, 71(1), 82-121.

Abstract: The Miconieae (Melastomaceae) are a strictly Neotropical group comprising over 1900 species. The tribe is characterized by inflorescences that are terminal or axillary, but not cauliflorous (except a few species of Charianthus, Clidemia, and Mecranium), flowers subtended by only one pair of bracteoles (or none at all), with anthers that lack a pedoconnective, leaves without long acicular raphides, and berry fruits. Generic delimitations within the Miconieae have been notoriously complex, and phylogenetic analyses have shown that Miconia is paraphyletic with many other genera embedded within it. These nested genera include Anaectocalyx, Calycogonium, Catocoryne, Charianthus, Clidemia, Conostegia, Killipia, Leandra, Maieta, Mecranium, Necramium, Ossaea, Pachyanthus, Pleiochiton, Sagraea, Tetrazygia, and Tococa. In the absence of a workable solution that allows the subdivision of the tribe into smaller, morphologically recognizable and monophyletic genera, it has been previously proposed that only one genus be recognized in the tribe. Here we present the necessary taxonomic and nomenclatural changes necessary to recognize Miconia as the sole genus within Miconieae.

Buket Aydas

July 3rd, 2019

Bahado-Singh, R. O., Vishweswaraiah, S., Aydas, B., Mishra, N. K., Guda, C., & Radhakrishna, U. (2019). Deep Learning/Artificial Intelligence and Blood-Based DNA Epigenomic Prediction of Cerebral Palsy. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 20(9), 2075.

Abstract: The etiology of cerebral palsy (CP) is complex and remains inadequately understood. Early detection of CP is an important clinical objective as this improves long term outcomes. We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis to identify epigenomic predictors of CP in newborns and to investigate disease pathogenesis. Methylation analysis of newborn blood DNA using an Illumina HumanMethylation450K array was performed in 23 CP cases and 21 unaffected controls. There were 230 significantly differentially-methylated CpG loci in 258 genes. Each locus had at least 2.0-fold change in methylation in CP versus controls with a FDR p-value ≤ 0.05. Methylation level for each CpG locus had an area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) ≥ 0.75 for CP detection. Using Artificial Intelligence (AI) platforms/Machine Learning (ML) analysis, CpG methylation levels in a combination of 230 significantly differentially-methylated CpG loci in 258 genes had a 95% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity for newborn prediction of CP. Using pathway analysis, multiple canonical pathways plausibly linked to neuronal function were over-represented. Altered biological processes and functions included: neuromotor damage, malformation of major brain structures, brain growth, neuroprotection, neuronal development and de-differentiation, and cranial sensory neuron development. In conclusion, blood leucocyte epigenetic changes analyzed using AI/ML techniques appeared to accurately predict CP and provided plausible mechanistic information on CP pathogenesis.

Jess Roberts

May 2nd, 2019

Roberts, J. (2018). The Living Child’s Place in Piatt’s Dead Child Poems. ESQ: A Journal of Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture, 64(2), 334-367.