Category: Supported by FURSCA

Kayleigh Pung, ’11

Olapade, O., & Pung, K. (2012). Plant-associated bacterial populations on native and invasive plant species: comparisons between 2 freshwater environments. Canadian Journal of Microbiology, 58(6), 767-775.

Abstract: Plant–microbial interactions have been well studied because of the ecological importance of such relationships in aquatic systems. However, general knowledge regarding the composition of these biofilm communities is still evolving, partly as a result of several confounding factors that are attributable to plant host properties and to hydrodynamic conditions in aquatic environments. In this study, the occurrences of various bacterial phylogenetic taxa on 2 native plants, i.e., mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum L.) and cow parsnip (Heracleum maximum Bartram), and on an invasive species, i.e., garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb.) Cavara & Grande), were quantitatively examined using nucleic acid staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The plants were incubated in triplicates for about a week within the Kalamazoo River and Pierce Cedar Creek as well as in microcosms. The bacterial groups targeted for enumeration are known to globally occur in relatively high abundance and are also ubiquitously distributed in freshwater environments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of the bacterioplankton assemblages revealed that the majority of bacterial cells that hybridized with the different probes were similar between the 2 sites. In contrast, the plant-associated populations while similar on the 3 plants incubated in Kalamazoo River, their representations were highest on the 2 native plants relative to the invasive species in Pierce Cedar Creek. Overall, our results further suggested that epiphytic bacterial assemblages are probably under the influences of and probably subsequently respond to multiple variables and conditions in aquatic milieus.

Adrienne VanZomeren-Dohm, ’07, Paul Beach, ’08, Wendy Simanton Holland, ’07

Flannery, E., VanZomeren-Dohm, A., Beach, P., Simanton Holland, W., & Duman-Scheel, M. (2010). Induction of Cellular Growth by the Axon Guidance Regulators Netrin a and Semaphorin-1a. Developmental Neurobiology, 70(7), 473-484.

Abstract: Although neurite outgrowth has been linked to axon guidance regulators, the effects of guidance molecules on cellular growth are not well understood. Use of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, an epithelial tissue and a well-characterized system for analysis of cellular growth regulation, permits analysis of the impacts of guidance molecules on cellular growth in a setting in which axon guidance is not a confounding factor. In this investigation, the impacts of Netrin A (NetA) and Semaphorin-1a (Sema1a) signaling on cellular growth are examined during wing development. Levels of these genes were modulated in somatic clones in the developing wing disc, and clone areas, as well as individual sizes of clonal cells were assessed. NetA and Sema1a signaling were found to induce cellular growth in these assays. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NetA and Sema1a signaling induce expression of several growth regulators, including myc, cycD, cdk4, PCNA, and MapK in the wing disc. These data illustrate that NetA and Sema1a can specifically promote growth through induction of key cellular growth regulators. The abilities of NetA and Sema1a to regulate cellular growth are likely critical to their functions in both nervous system development and oncogenesis. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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