Posts tagged: 2010

Nicholas Herrman, ’12

Bindman, N., Merkx, R., Koehler, R., Herrman, N., & van der Donk, W. A. (2010). Photochemical cleavage of leader peptides. Chemical Communications, 46(47), 8935-8937.

Abstract: We report a photolabile linker compatible with Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis and Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition that allows photochemical cleavage to afford a C-terminal peptide fragment with a native amino terminus. (Journal abstract)

Jacob Rinkinen, ’11

Togunde, D., & Rinkinen, J. (2010). Homogeneous Faith, Ethnic Diversity: Desirable and Undesirable Traits in a Marital Partner in Nigeria. International Journal of Diversity in Organizations, Communities and Nations, 10(1), 219-238.

Abstract: This paper draws on survey data gathered in 2007 from over 2000 students in six Nigerian universities to investigate desirable and undesirable traits in a future marital partner and how these traits vary by gender. Until now, there is no single study in the African context that examines how measures of Westernization and globalization impact qualities desired in a mate. Findings indicate that a vast majority of respondents prefer to select their future marital partner on their own rather than through an arranged marriage. Yet an overwhelming proportion of students are unwilling to marry someone without the consent of their parents. Respondents would prefer not to marry a partner who: does not possess a comparable university education; does not want to have children; lack domestic skills; are not good at cooking; does not believe in God; and practices a different religion. However, respondents are more willing to marry someone who: comes from different tribal/ethnic group or nationality; and has had previous sexual relations. Significant gender differences were found to exist in traits such as domestic skills, age difference between spouses, level of education, parental socio-economic status, and desire to have children. The conclusion is that a simultaneous operation of traditional and contemporary mating dynamics is taking place in Nigeria. The urban-based respondents seem to hold on to some aspects of African traditional culture and practices regarding desirable and undesirable traits in a marital partner. At the same time, the criteria for mate selection are being impacted by forces of Westernization and globalization, such as the internet and foreign mass media.

Jacob Rinkinen, 11

Togunde, D., Osagie, S., & Rinkinen, J. (2010). Dating Patterns and Practices in the Era of Globalization in Nigeria. Global Studies Journal, 3(2), 67-84.

Abstract: This paper seeks to understand dating patterns and practices among Nigerian undergraduate students in the era of globalization. Drawing on data collected in 2007 from over 2,000 students in six universities, the paper investigates the patterns, avenues, and motivations for dating; explores the onset of dating and determines whether or not respondents have ever dated or are currently dating a person of the same sex; and whether they utilize the Internet, newspapers/magazines, and television programs to find their romantic partners. Results reveal that both the classrooms and religious places of worship (churches and mosques) are the dominant avenues for finding mates. An overwhelming proportion (70.5%) indicated that their most important reason for dating is to find a future marital partner, followed by the desire to experience love and companionship (22.7%). Number of partners dated at a time, use of the Internet, newspapers/magazines and television as avenues for meeting partners vary significantly by respondents’ gender, religion, and place of birth. However, an overwhelming number of both males and females believe that males should pay for dating expenses although a lower proportion does so in practice. An insignificant percentage of respondents admitted to having same-sex relationships. Overall, the conclusion is that a cultural dualism exists as Western dating culture co-exists with traditional dating practices. The study provides an opportunity to uncover the extent to which modernization and globalization affect intimate relationships such as dating in a transitional society.

Jeff Stephens, ’09

Tingley, R., Herman, T., Pulsifer, M., McCurdy, D., & Stephens, J. (2010). Intra-Specific Niche Partitioning Obscures the Importance of Fine-Scale Habitat Data in Species Distribution Models. Biodiversity and Conservation, 19(9), 2455-2467.

Abstract: Geographic information systems (GIS) allow researchers to make cost-effective, spatially explicit predictions of species’ distributions across broad geographic areas. However, there has been little research on whether using fine-scale habitat data collected in the field could produce more robust models of species’ distributions. Here we used radio-telemetry data collected on a declining species, the North American wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta), to test whether fine-scale habitat variables were better predictors of occurrence than land-cover and topography variables measured in a GIS. Patterns of male and female occurrence were similar in the spring; however, females used a much wider array of land-cover types and topographic positions in the summer and early fall, making it difficult for GIS-based models to accurately predict female occurrence at this time of year. Males on the other hand consistently selected flat, low-elevation, riparian areas throughout the year, and this consistency in turn led to the development of a strong GIS-based model. These results demonstrate the importance of taking a more sex-specific and temporally dynamic view of the environmental niche.

Timothy Stevens, ’10

Yoo, G. H., Kafri, Z., Ensley, J. F., Lonardo, F., Kim, H., Folbe, A. J., Won, J., Stevens, T., Lin, H. (2010). Xrp6258-Induced Gene Expression Patterns in Head and Neck Cancer Carcinoma. The Laryngoscope. Published online April 20, 2010.

Abstract: XRP6258 is a novel taxoid, which has antitumor activity in preclinical mouse orthotopic and human xenograft cancer models. However, limited XRP6258 studies have been performed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells (HNSCC). The objective of this study is to identify the antitumor activity of XRP6258 in HNSCC cell line models.HNSCC cells (HN30 and HN12) were exposed to either XRP6258 or docetaxel. XRP6258-induced growth suppression, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were measured. Further, XRP6258-induced expression patterns of selected genes were compared to docetaxel-induced expression patterns using Western blot analysis.XRP6258 suppressed proliferation and induced G2M arrest and apoptosis in both of the cell lines tested. XRP6258 and docetaxel produced similar alteration in the expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin A and cyclin B1. The expression of E2F and EGFR were decreased in both XRP6258 and docetaxel-treated HNSCC cells. Finally, XRP6258 induced a greater level of bcl2 phosphorylation than docetaxel in HN12 cell line.XRP6258 appeared to have a similar mechanism of action as docetaxel in the two HNSCC cell lines studied. XRP6258 induced cell cycle arrest, growth suppression, and apoptosis by altering gene expression patterns similar to that induced by docetaxel. These preclinical experiments suggest that XRP6258 may be useful in treating HNSCC, and the aforementioned genes can potentially be used as surrogate endpoint biomarkers. Laryngoscope, 2010

Adrienne VanZomeren-Dohm, ’07, Paul Beach, ’08, Wendy Simanton Holland, ’07

Flannery, E., VanZomeren-Dohm, A., Beach, P., Simanton Holland, W., & Duman-Scheel, M. (2010). Induction of Cellular Growth by the Axon Guidance Regulators Netrin a and Semaphorin-1a. Developmental Neurobiology, 70(7), 473-484.

Abstract: Although neurite outgrowth has been linked to axon guidance regulators, the effects of guidance molecules on cellular growth are not well understood. Use of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, an epithelial tissue and a well-characterized system for analysis of cellular growth regulation, permits analysis of the impacts of guidance molecules on cellular growth in a setting in which axon guidance is not a confounding factor. In this investigation, the impacts of Netrin A (NetA) and Semaphorin-1a (Sema1a) signaling on cellular growth are examined during wing development. Levels of these genes were modulated in somatic clones in the developing wing disc, and clone areas, as well as individual sizes of clonal cells were assessed. NetA and Sema1a signaling were found to induce cellular growth in these assays. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NetA and Sema1a signaling induce expression of several growth regulators, including myc, cycD, cdk4, PCNA, and MapK in the wing disc. These data illustrate that NetA and Sema1a can specifically promote growth through induction of key cellular growth regulators. The abilities of NetA and Sema1a to regulate cellular growth are likely critical to their functions in both nervous system development and oncogenesis. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Elizabeth Weage, ’08

Olapade, O. A., & Weage, E. A. (2010). Comparison of Fecal Indicator Bacterial Populations in Surface Waters of the Kalamazoo River, USA. Microbes and Environments, 25(1).

Abstract: Surface waters along the Kalamazoo River, USA, were examined for occurrence and population trends of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) with culture-based and culture-independent methods. The two methods recorded discrepancies in FIB counts, with the culture-independent method revealing more consistent numbers between the river sites. FIB cells that hybridized with the ECO1482 probe were highest in the downstream site, while the upstream site recorded higher ENF343 hybridized cells. Spatial and temporal differences in FIB populations were probably attributable to contrasting fecal pollution influences, vegetation type, varying environmental conditions as well as several in-stream factors between the two river sites.

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