Posts tagged: 2011

Soe Yu Nwe

Nwe, Soe Yu (“Joy”). “House.” Michigan Ceramic Art Association Michigan Mud Conference Award Winner: Michigan Ceramic Art Association, 2011.

Description:  Junior Soe Yu Nwe (“Joy” on campus) took one of the top four student  awards at the biennial Michigan Ceramic Art Association Michigan Mud conference held in October 2011.

Soe Yu Nwe’s winning sculpture, “House,” was inspired by a childhood spent on both sides of the border between Thailand and the Union of Myanmar.   Many Thai families have “spirit houses,” small structures which are decorated and sometimes furnished for spirits tied to that land.  Click on the image below for more information.

'House,' Soe Yu Nwe's winning entry

Derek Burkholder, ’04

Burkholder, D. A., Heithaus, M. R., Thomson, J. A., & Fourqurean, J. W. (2011). Diversity in trophic interactions of green sea turtles Chelonia mydas on a relatively pristine coastal foraging ground. Marine Ecology-Progress Series, 439, 277-293.

Abstract: Adult green sea turtles Chelonia mydas are often the largest-bodied herbivores in their communities and may play an important role in structuring seagrass and macroalgal communities. Recent studies, however, suggest that green turtles might be more omnivorous than previously thought. We used animal-borne video and nitrogen and carbon stable isotopic analysis of skin to elucidate diets of green turtles in the relatively pristine seagrass ecosystem of Shark Bay, Australia. Stable isotope values suggested that despite the presence of abundant seagrass resources, turtles assimilated most of their energy from a combination of macroalgae and gelatinous macroplankton (cnidarians and ctenophores). Video data suggested that macroplankton might be the most commonly consumed food source. Also surprising was the considerable variation in delta(13)C values, suggesting long-term dietary specialization by individual turtles. Overall, green turtle foraging under natural conditions may be less stereotyped than previously thought, and diets of green turtles inhabiting apparently similar ecosystems (e. g. seagrass-dominated ecosystems) may vary considerably across geographical regions. The apparently high degree of individual specialization in diets suggests that conservation efforts should account not only for the potential importance of non-benthic food sources for green turtle populations, but also for the possibility that subsets of the population may play different ecological roles and may be differentially vulnerable to anthropogenic impacts.

Kayleigh Pung, 11, Erin Goldman, ’11

Olapade, O. A., Pung, K., Goldman, E., & Lyons-Sobaski, S. (2011). Occurrence and diversity of epiphytic bacterial communities on two native plant species in a Michigan Creek. Journal of Freshwater Ecology, 26(2), 267 – 276.

Abstract: We examined the occurrence and diversity of bacteria of different phylogenetic groups in epiphytic assemblages on two native Michigan plant species mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum) and cow parsnip (Heracleum maximum) when the plant leaves were submerged in fresh water. Fresh leaves were incubated in triplicate for about a week within a creek in Hasting, Michigan, and in laboratory microcosm to develop mature epiphytic assemblages. We enumerated bacteria in these assemblages by nucleic acid staining (i.e., total direct counts using 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenyllindole) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), while community diversity was determined based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. FISH indicated the dominance of members of the γProteobacterial subclass (20%) on both plant species, while the 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed the predominance of the βProteobacteria (51%) on mayapple and the Fermicutes (26%) on cow parsnip, with the Bacteroidetes present equally within the epiphytic assemblages on both plants.

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