Posts tagged: Jacob Rinkinen

Jacob Rinkinen, ’11

Togunde, D., & Rinkinen, J. (2010). Homogeneous Faith, Ethnic Diversity: Desirable and Undesirable Traits in a Marital Partner in Nigeria. International Journal of Diversity in Organizations, Communities and Nations, 10(1), 219-238.

Abstract: This paper draws on survey data gathered in 2007 from over 2000 students in six Nigerian universities to investigate desirable and undesirable traits in a future marital partner and how these traits vary by gender. Until now, there is no single study in the African context that examines how measures of Westernization and globalization impact qualities desired in a mate. Findings indicate that a vast majority of respondents prefer to select their future marital partner on their own rather than through an arranged marriage. Yet an overwhelming proportion of students are unwilling to marry someone without the consent of their parents. Respondents would prefer not to marry a partner who: does not possess a comparable university education; does not want to have children; lack domestic skills; are not good at cooking; does not believe in God; and practices a different religion. However, respondents are more willing to marry someone who: comes from different tribal/ethnic group or nationality; and has had previous sexual relations. Significant gender differences were found to exist in traits such as domestic skills, age difference between spouses, level of education, parental socio-economic status, and desire to have children. The conclusion is that a simultaneous operation of traditional and contemporary mating dynamics is taking place in Nigeria. The urban-based respondents seem to hold on to some aspects of African traditional culture and practices regarding desirable and undesirable traits in a marital partner. At the same time, the criteria for mate selection are being impacted by forces of Westernization and globalization, such as the internet and foreign mass media.

Jacob Rinkinen, 11

Togunde, D., Osagie, S., & Rinkinen, J. (2010). Dating Patterns and Practices in the Era of Globalization in Nigeria. Global Studies Journal, 3(2), 67-84.

Abstract: This paper seeks to understand dating patterns and practices among Nigerian undergraduate students in the era of globalization. Drawing on data collected in 2007 from over 2,000 students in six universities, the paper investigates the patterns, avenues, and motivations for dating; explores the onset of dating and determines whether or not respondents have ever dated or are currently dating a person of the same sex; and whether they utilize the Internet, newspapers/magazines, and television programs to find their romantic partners. Results reveal that both the classrooms and religious places of worship (churches and mosques) are the dominant avenues for finding mates. An overwhelming proportion (70.5%) indicated that their most important reason for dating is to find a future marital partner, followed by the desire to experience love and companionship (22.7%). Number of partners dated at a time, use of the Internet, newspapers/magazines and television as avenues for meeting partners vary significantly by respondents’ gender, religion, and place of birth. However, an overwhelming number of both males and females believe that males should pay for dating expenses although a lower proportion does so in practice. An insignificant percentage of respondents admitted to having same-sex relationships. Overall, the conclusion is that a cultural dualism exists as Western dating culture co-exists with traditional dating practices. The study provides an opportunity to uncover the extent to which modernization and globalization affect intimate relationships such as dating in a transitional society.

Jacob Rinkinen, ’11

Togunde, D., & Rinkinen, J. (2009). Agents of Change: Gender Differences in Migration Intentions among University Undergraduates in Nigeria. International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, 4(2), 175-190.

Abstract: This paper draws on surveys/interviews with 678 Nigerian university undergraduates to examine migration intentions and to detect if gender differences exist in reasons to migrate (or not) to the United States. This study is unique by focusing on future migration among university students, whose views and migration plans have been neglected in previous studies. As a departure from few previous scholarships in Africa, the paper introduces two new variables: perception of America as a land of socio-economic opportunities and whether respondents actively participate in the U.S. Visa Lottery Program. Findings indicate that a higher proportion of males than females cites better employment opportunities as reason for planning to move. However, more females than males mention security and better infrastructures available in America as motives for wanting to emigrate within the next five years. A higher proportion of women than men mention social and cultural ties with homeland and perception of racism in America as factors discouraging them from wanting to live in the United States; whereas, more men than women wanting to stay in Nigeria refer to patriotism/love of homeland as reasons. Perception of America as a land of opportunities and active participation in the U.S. Visa Lottery Program are among significant predictors of intentions to migrate. Findings have implications for policies aimed at improving quality of life in Nigeria, thereby, reducing emigration of “future leaders of tomorrow”.

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